Storytelling thru Gameplay: World 3 of Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze

In this post we’ll continue our examination of the visual storytelling behind Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze. In previous posts we examined the storytelling in World 1 and World 2 and discovered that, if you look at each level’s backgrounds, enemy placements, and themes, you can learn much about DK’s quest to return to his frozen homeland.

Let’s get started!

An African homecoming

World 3, Bright Savannah, is a welcome addition to the Country series’ themes. While we’ve seen plenty of jungles in the DKC series, a natural habitat for gorillas and monkeys, we haven’t seen the savannah before. The first level, Grassland Groove, has such a happy vibe to it that it really contrasts with the previous worlds, especially the Lost Mangroves.

We see a few Snowmads in this level, but they are relatively peaceful. Considering the dancing trees, the chanting voices, and the frequent fireworks, Grassland Groove doesn’t seem to care about the conflict between DK and the Snowmads!

In the background we see several houses, though it’s not certain who lives in them. In the previous world, Autumn Heights, it was clearly established that the homes were the refuge of the owls.

Grassland Groove

Grassland Groove

The inhabitants of Grassland Groove, whoever they are (the flying chickens?) have a rich culture, as seen with the animal totems and fireworks.

Grassland Groove

Grassland Groove

By the last third of the level, the backgrounds open up to reveal miles and miles of unspoiled grasslands. While some culture outside of DK and the Snowmads live in the Bright Savannah, their impact on the land is minimal. As I gazed upon these soaring vistas, I felt like the Snowmads could make a life here without disrupting the current ecosystem.

Grassland Groove

The level ends with DK on top of giant totems. The sun shines, the music swells, and the chorus sings “Donnnnkeyyyy Kongggg!”

Grassland Groove

As we’ll see later in this post, the Snowmads don’t have such a respectful approach to the Savannah as this level might suggest. In fact, this level might have worked better as World 1-1. This optimistic level, the best one in the game with a complete through line, would’ve been the perfect way to begin the game.

A harsh landscape

In level 3-2, Baobab Bonanza, we learn firsthand what a difficult terrain the Bright Savannah is. The baobabs are trees that release giant, crushing seeds. Not only do DK and the Snowmads have to contend with the plant life, but also the high rocks, waterfalls, and charging water buffalo. It’s survival of the fittest in the Savannah!

Baobab Bonanza

Baobab Bonanza

There’s little evidence that any particular culture lives here—monkey, Snowmad, or otherwise. The threat of three-story tall seeds probably has something to do with that.

Baobab Bonanza

In 3-3, Frantic Fields, we see that the Snowmads have indeed established a firm presence on the Savannah. Grassscapes extend from horizon to horizon. While both the Snowmads and DK caused me a bit of consternation in World 2 for their mutual destruction of the owl’s culture, I’m fine with the Snowmads taking up residence here.

However, they learn right away that this land isn’t for the feint of heart and weak of will. A mighty windstorm rises up, threatening to undo their progress.

Frantic Fields

Frantic FieldsThe numerous Snowmad flags show that they’ve been here for a while, and they intend to keep this land as their own, like imperial conquerors.

Frantic Fields

Their ambitions, though, are checked when pieces of their bridges and structures are torn away by tornadoes.

Frantic Fields

The native fauna don’t seem to be putting up too much of a fight against the Snowmads. Additionally, they aren’t rushing to join their cause either, like the owls did in Autumn Heights. The animals have enough problems of their own. Just look at this water buffalo tumbling end over end through the windstorm!

Frantic Fields

That scene just cracks me up. 🙂

The environmental challenges increase in 3-4, Scorch ‘n’ Torch. As far as I can tell, there’s no evidence of any cultures that live in this level. We don’t see homes like in Grassland Groove, and we don’t seen wooden forts like in Frantic Fields. It appears that in the burning land, anybody who can survive can claim it as home.

Scorch 'n' Torch

The Snowmad penguins seem oddly complacent in the land of fire. Considering fire isn’t the natural habitat of the penguin, I’m not sure if these penguins are resigned to their fate on the Savannah or if they are that confident they can survive in the face of overwhelming odds against them.

Scorch 'n' Torch

Jackpot! The Snowmads find fish

In level 3-5, Twilight Terror, the visual storytelling gets a lot more interesting. This is a pseudo-water level. Given that the Snowmads are a seafaring nation, and comprised primarily of water-loving animals, Twilight Terror showcases the first part of the Bright Savannah that’s actually suited to their needs and desires. In fact, of all the levels so far, the shores of Twilight Terror are the most fitting home for the Snowmads.

And boy have they settled in. A series of dams, cranes, and structures cover the landscape. The Snowmads have set up shop in a big way.

Twilight Terror

These waters prove bountiful. The Snowmads lift net after net of beautiful, glistening fish from the sea.

Twilight Terror

The Snowmads have even set up some sort of processing (or canning?) operation, perhaps to send much needed supplies to places like the Lost Mangroves.

Twilight Terror

In 3-6, Cannon Canyons, we find the largest Snowmad base yet. This sprawling city, extending high into the air and through every canyon, shows that the Snowmads mean business. This city is a large contrast to the more modest camps seen in previous levels. Perhaps with the huge supply of fish close by, the Snowmads figure they can make a life here on the Savannah.

Cannon Canyons

While the Snowmads had trouble settling the land in earlier Savannah levels, by 3-6, they’ve proven that they have the engineering expertise needed to survive.

DK, though, does everything in his power to blast through their walls and towers, doing some damage to their city.

Cannon Canyons

Cannon Canyons

Cannon Canyons

Maybe if the Snowmads didn’t construct their DK traps out of dynamite, they could’ve avoided some of this damage. 🙂

Despite the threat posed by DK, and the numerous anti-DK signs everywhere (the red ties on shields with a line through them), some Snowmads apparently find time to rest. Inside the building to the right of DK in the following screencap, a penguin sleeps peacefully. It’s hard to tell in the screencap, but in motion, you can see the penguin’s chest rise and fall as his head rests on his plump belly.

Cannon Canyons

In 3A, Rickety Rafters, the Snowmads continue to build their civilization. They create numerous mechanical contraptions and homes on stilts, and at first, it’s not clear what they are trying to accomplish.

Rickety Rafters

Rickety Rafters

In the middle of the level, we get a glimpse at what these machines might be for. Three Snowmadic ships are hanging suspended in the air. This, however, is only a partial explanation. Why hoist the ships so high? While it’s a neat visual, I’m not sure how it fits with the wider storytelling on display in this world. If you look at the Level Select map before entering the level, there isn’t even any water nearby.

Rickety Rafters

The Snowmads can’t survive everywhere

Level 3-B, Bramble Scramble, shows that the Snowmads are still having some trouble on the Bright Savannah. Thorns cover the level from top to bottom: almost nobody lives here, though a few penguins are seen wandering around. This level, much like Baobab Bonanza, shows that the Snowmads can’t adapt to every environment.

Bramble Scramble

Bramble Scramble

Just like the other worlds, a secret monkey temple was constructed on the Bright Savannah long ago. In 3-K, Precarious Pendulums, we find that the Snowmads have raided another temple.

This temple features many movable contraptions, though I don’t think the Snowmads made them, despite their engineering prowess. Considering the deep scratch marks in the stone walls, these devices have been here for some time.

Precarious Pendulums

What’s interesting about these temples is that, while Snowmad imagery like flags drape the interior, they seem like they were hastily hung up. Given the emptiness of these temples, it’s probable that the Snowmads already raided these temples of their treasures long before DK arrived.

Precarious Pendulums

Precarious Pendulums

Silly monkeys with their bananas

DK and crew arrive at the final boss to find their bananas stolen again. While previous boss battles have featuredcrowds of Snowmads eagerly watching the conflict, the this arena is relatively sparse. Only a few penguins sit in the stands.

Triple Trouble

Do they not see DK as a threat? Are they bored with these staged fights? Or do they have more important things to do? Considering how industrious they’ve been in building cities, cranes, and fish nets, the Snowmads might be too tired on the Bright Savannah to give entertainment much thought.

The enemies this time are three apes, decked out with Snowmad helmets.

Triple Trouble

Given that monkeys aren’t seen elsewhere in the game as enemies, it seems to me that these monkeys are screwing around, having some fun with DK, rather than siding with the Snowmads the way the owls did in Autumn Heights. Monkeys naturally compete over food in the wild, and given the taunting attitude of these monkeys, I’m guessing they put the Snowmad helmets on as a way of taunting the penguins.

Maybe that’s why nobody’s in the stands.

Overall, the Bright Savannah has some interesting contradictions as far as storytelling goes. On the one hand, I think this world’s bright opening would’ve made it much better suited as World 1 than World 3, especially since the theme in World 1 isn’t that memorable. The first few levels show a surprising balance between the Snowmad civilization and the native animals.

As the world progresses, though, the Snowmad civilization really gets established in a much more effective and permanent way than in the previous two worlds, justifying the Bright Savannah’s placement as World 3. The Snowmads cut their teeth in World 1, and ultimately realized, as did past civilizations, that the Mangroves are uninhabitable. In World 2 they recruited the owls, in part because of DK’s violence against the owl culture.

Now in World 3, the Snowmads have established a firm presence. Will the Bright Savannah serve as a launching point for the conquest of more islands? We’ll see next time as we explore the storytelling of World 4: Sea Breeze Cove!

Game on,
~Dennis

4 thoughts on “Storytelling thru Gameplay: World 3 of Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze

  1. Good point. Then again, given the size of some of those fish, they might need heavy-duty ships to carry the cargo. Or it could just be a classic case of villains going over the top with their contraptions rather than taking the easier way; I doubt K. Rool really needed all those wind shafts and poison vats, but they helped give a memorable flair to his keep. But yeah, it’s all open to interpretation. I just appreciate when there are little tidbits in the background and levels for us to look at and wonder about.

    Anyway, I look forward to hearing what you have to say about the fourth world. I just wish they didn’t have the air limit mechanic built in; I miss the good ol’ days in the first three Country games when you could just slowly paddle through the watery passages and explore every cranny without worrying about drowning. Not to mention that I miss Enguarde

    • My thoughts on the next worlds are coming soon!
      I agree that the breathing mechanic could’ve been left out. The water levels in the original trilogy, especially the first game, were such fun to play. The levels in the first game were always very peaceful, coupled with the awesome music. I am glad, though, that they brought back water levels, considering Returns didn’t have any!

  2. Actually, if you look on the map screen, it shows a little trickle of water streaming into the area just under Rickety Rafters. Given that and the limits of the map, I’m guessing that a network of rivers runs through the canyons. Therefore, it makes sense for the Snowmads to build their ships there, as it may very well be the main water link to the sea.

    Moreover, the ship cranes may serve a larger purpose by transporting the boats between water bodies. The canyon’s rivers might be too narrow or rugged at points for transportation, but the Snowmads need some way to connect their lucrative freshwater fishing trade to the larger activities of the empire. Therefore, the cranes can help ferry the boats between different river points until they reach either the sea or the lake village.

    • Thanks for the insight. Your theory is plausible, but to me it seems more work than it’s worth. If the Snowmads are going to build ships, why not build them on the sea itself? And cranes seem like a pretty inefficient way of transporting such large ships across land.

      If the issue is transferring fish from an inland lake to the sea, then a smaller system of boats, like canoes, seems more plausible than overloading ships and moving them by crane!

      But certainly, all of this is open to interpretation. After all, the game itself doesn’t explain any of the background visuals, hence we speculate!

      ~Dennis

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